Archive for February, 2009

Advice to college students

Earlier this month I visited an Integrated Communications Campaign class taught by my former boss at SLU. She asked me to talk to the class of college juniors and seniors… telling them about my college experience, job search and job. After telling my story (and probably boring the poor kids for 30 minutes), I offered a couple bits of advice:

If I could offer you some advice, I’d tell you to do something that you love. Something that you don’t mind getting there early to do or staying late. Don’t know what you want to do? You need to get out there! Intern. Job shadow. Go on informational interviews. Volunteer. You’ll learn best by doing.

When at all possible, work with people that you respect and will make you a better person. I have been extremely fortunate to work with people like this.

Your personal brand is important. Who you know and what you’ve done… that’s who you are. Network. And never burn bridges.

If you’re interested in getting into interactive marketing, do it. Our generation is naturally more tech savvy because we’ve grown up doing it. Read blogs. Check out web sites. Talk to people in the business.

Keep idea books. Bookmark web sites you like or articles that have good ideas in them. Part of what makes people successful in marketing is knowing what’s already been done… and how you can apply similar principles to your clients and innovate by improving on what’s already out there.

Then, to my surprise, I came across an article today: 10 job hunting tips for this year’s college graduates. In his blog post, Edward Boches,  Chief Creative Officer of Mullen, offers some very similar tips for how to get hired in advertising right out of school.

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February 20, 2009 at 6:15 pm 1 comment

If it looks like a duck and quacks like a duck

Young people are constantly challenged to fit in at work. Generational gaps exist between every age range.

I came across this article today: 6 ways to fit in when you’re the youngest person in the room.

Some other things that I think are important to remember when you’re the youngest person:

  1. It’s like playing poker. So play your cards right. In some situations, your youth will be to your advantage. In others, it’s best to lay low.
  2. Dress appropriately. That doesn’t mean dressing like you’re 80, but it does mean that you need to think of how your elders will perceive your wardrobe.
  3. Remember that things that may be socially acceptable to younger employees will not fly with older colleagues. For example: Facebook at work. Instant messaging. Walking around with your iPod on. [insert technology related age gap item here]
  4. Stay up-to-date (and do your research) since you’re young, you should know what’s going on now. But since they’re old, you need to be able to relate to ghosts of workplace past.

February 16, 2009 at 10:21 pm 1 comment