Stats on the job market

A little depressing, but important to know.

This article from Dime Crunch states that the average job search is lasting 211 days and that there are 11.5 million receiving unemployment benefits right now, with more than 1.5 million expecting their benefits to run out in March.

Knowing that, ramp up your job search!

Revise your resume, get networking and improve your interviewing skills.

Need help? Let me know!

Advertisements

March 8, 2010 at 6:19 pm Leave a comment

Why Don’t They Call Back

After talking to some friends dealing with frustration over going on job interviews and not hearing back from potential employers, I thought it might be helpful to share this article from Talent Zoo offering Nine Reasons Recruiters Never Call and some advice on how to overcome these obstacles. It’s a good read.

March 2, 2010 at 3:53 pm Leave a comment

Send Thank You Notes

I don’t know how many times I’ve said it, but I’ll say it again.

Send a handwritten thank you note within 24 hours of your interview.

Over and over again, people tell me they never got a call back from an interview. When I ask if they send a thank you note and they shrug their shoulders, I know at least one reason they didn’t get a call back.

Don’t believe me?

Read these two articles that say what I’ve been saying all along: SEND THANK YOU NOTES! TO EVERYONE WITH WHICH YOU INTERVIEW!

http://www.freemoneyfinance.com/2009/12/great-thoughts-on-thank-you-notes.html

http://www.personalbrandingblog.com/a-little-thank-you-goes-a-long-way/

December 17, 2009 at 8:06 pm Leave a comment

Un-un-employed

The latest stats say that the unemployment rate went down last month. But what does that number really say? It does not account for people who aren’t collecting unemployment, those who have taken part-time jobs because they cannot find full-time professional work, or those that have pushed off entering the job market by staying in school.

Here’s a great little video from Mint.com that I found via Beyond Paycheck to Paycheck. I highly recommend reading this blog post which goes into some greater detail about the difference between being unemployed and underemployed and how the underemployed are not included in the peachy statistical analyses.

December 7, 2009 at 4:53 pm Leave a comment

Tips for a Successful Phone Interview

It’s getting harder than ever to get your foot in the door. Often times, employers and recruiters use phone interviews as their first line of defense to weed out unqualified candidates.

I recommend reading this article from Talent Zoo, which includes lots of helpful tips on how to improve your chances getting past the gatekeeper so you can score an in-person interview.

Some of my favorites are:

  • Do your research about the company AND THE INTERVIEWER ahead of time
  • Write out your answers to common interview questions, as well as your top selling points you want to make sure you get across to the interviewer no matter want
  • Draft up a list of questions and make sure you ask at least a few during the call if given the opportunity

November 24, 2009 at 5:51 pm 1 comment

Benefits Beyond Salary

A recurring theme amongst the people I talk to that are fielding job offers (in this awful economy) is trying to understand what a good offer is.

Most people consider the salary offer as the job offer. But it is more than that. You need to consider the entire benefits package: insurance, retirement, commission and bonuses, potential for growth, and “intangible” benefits like the working environment, job location, etc.

I suggest reading this article from Talent Zoo about 5 Financial Secrets to Know When You Look for A Job by Ted Jenkin. He discusses many of these additional benefits and poses some questions for you to consider when you get the long awaited offer.

October 2, 2009 at 3:14 pm Leave a comment

Identifying, qualifying and quantifying your achievements

The first thing I ask people to do when they want to update their resume, is to give me a description of their work history and achievements.

For most everyone, it’s pretty easy for them to tell me the dates and places where they have worked, past job titles and companies. But it’s that achievements part that is hard for them to come up with.

Use this list to figure out what you’ve accomplished. Once you have the list, try to weave accomplishments in with your job responsibilities and duties.

Actions: Did you…

  1. open new accounts?
  2. create an infrastructure for any function(s)?
  3. design and/or implement standard operating procedures?
  4. develop the professional capabilities of people who were then promoted to positions of greater accountability and/or who outperformed peers?
  5. add new products?
  6. develop or strengthen vendor partnerships?
  7. launch a new brand?
  8. develop a training program?
  9. initiate and/or manage a major project?
  10. renegotiate contracts?
  11. reengineer business processes?
  12. restructure organizations?
  13. write or redesign job descriptions?
  14. reach new audiences?
  15. grow subscribers or membership base?
  16. improve the accuracy of sales forecasts?
  17. start a new division?
  18. grow your referral base?
  19. begin sourcing or production in a new region or country?
  20. start outsourcing tasks?
  21. expand your presence to a new geographic territory?
  22. establish quality standards?
  23. start evaluating vendor performance?
  24. write an employee or vendor manual?
  25. design forms or templates?
  26. introduce and/or direct programs that resulted in achievement of certain industry standards?
  27. expand or consolidate your vendor base?
  28. accelerate product development?
  29. implement new technology-based solutions or lead technology integrations?
  30. win support from internal or external groups?
  31. create a reference library or archives of key information?
  32. improve inventory accuracy?
  33. decrease order-to-delivery lead times or speed-to-market times?
  34. design and/or institute order tracking or call tracking systems?
  35. start a safety program?
  36. automate a process previously performed manually?
  37. eliminate unnecessary or redundant processes?
  38. design a business continuity plan?
  39. get rid of unprofitable product lines or customer accounts?
  40. align services with customer requirements?

Results: As a result of these actions, did you…

  • increase sales/profits?
  • reduce costs?
  • grow market share?
  • increase service levels?
  • achieve better quality or consistency?
  • improve safety and/or reduce risk?
  • boost productivity?
  • lower employee turnover?
  • improve company’s reputation?
  • position the company for future growth?

This list is adapted from a WiseBread blog post.

September 25, 2009 at 9:16 pm 1 comment

Older Posts Newer Posts